Close

Zachary Courtright


About

I grew up with 5 siblings in a small town south of Cleveland, Ohio. I graduated from The Ohio State University with a Bachelors Degree in Welding Engineering in 2015 and a Masters Degree in Welding Engineering in 2017. I began working for NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in June, 2015. While at NASA I have worked on a wide array of projects, some of which are: Research and development for electron beam welding, inertia welding, friction stir welding, selective laser melting (worked with metals from aluminum and titanium to rhenium and tungsten). Weld consulting work and support for additive integration into the RS-25 engine. Publishing 5 NASA Technical Memorandums on research and development related projects. I was awarded the 1 year NASA Full-time Degree Seeking Program to pursue a PhD in Materials Science and Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. I was the project manager for the WFIRST weld development project where I managed all aspects of a friction stir weld development project from tool design and data analysis to finances and communications with the customer. I have gained experience working with people of varying background and skill. I had previous internships at United Launch Alliance (working with resistance spot welding of stainless steel) and Dearing Compressor and Pump Company (weld radiography, welder performance analysis and weld inspection). I earned a private pilots license in July, 2019. I enjoy ceramics, hiking, billiard games and travel. I look forward to forming lifelong friendships and working relationships with colleagues. I plan to minor in Business Management. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Research Interests: - High throughput mechanical testing and its applications to additive manufacturing and welding. - Characterization of metal additive manufacturing by relating bulk material properties to microstructural morphology.